This new surgery…..

Back in March, I was commenting more about how this right-hand of mine shaking too much was really bothering me. Welll…. It is either…

  • not shaking so bad.
  • not noticing it.
  • eh, just got used to it. Pretty much the same as not noticing. I mean, it shook bad before and now it just shakes “more” again. Maybe I’ve forgotten how much better it was?

Kinda leaning towards the “not so bad”, but I’m sure that I’ve gotten used to it.


Been sort of surfing through YouTube and found other people who have gone through the same new surgery I’m looking forward to. ……

Easiest way to say anything (like the surgery I’ve HAD BEFORE) is the outcome is not exactly the same for every person who has it done.

Doc from Last Month…

Saw this new doc again today. Just a slight change in the amount of medication, but that was about it. It was discussed that the “tremor removal surgery” has to wait to be decided upon. This doctor has said the surgeon, who particularly does the implant (that I discussed a month ago),  won’t have the time for another several months. Sooooo…. no REAL change.

The Psych…

Well.. with the new Psychologist, here are the things to be done. What I originally thought is that a is there would be new medication to help me with the psych-things (whatever those things are called). I learned that his idea in mind was what to prescribe to me was a medication that I WAS ALREADY ON.

He suggested to INCREASE a med and help with needs. Seizures (one thing it’s good for) is what I don’t need it for anymore. Um, but I have been trying to get that medication LOWERED by using another medication.

Being put back ON the medication that I worked hard to get off by getting this brain surgery??? HELL NO! The whole reason (to me) to have this brain surgery was to get off the stuff. I need to speak with someone else, or something like that.

Need to think about what to do next….

Allot Better Today

With these last couple days, I’ve been feeling as if I was just dealing with side-effects of the new medication. Today I’m just thinking ….. “maybe I’m done with the major side-effects?” HOPEFULLY? But, there’s always going to be side-effects. 

I’m not as wore-out as I was the last few. 

Awoke and out of bed at a decent time (7 AM). Maybe this day will be the beginning of normal days…. again…

Morning after new medication…

I got out of bed this morning (finally) at 10:00. It’s true that I went to bed a bit later than usual, just because I wanted to. Eh. No more of that. Previously, before this new medication, sleeping from midnight to 7:00 was just fine. Now, it was midnight to 10:00. I need earlier.

Sitting here this afternoon, I’m so tired.

Then again, it might be partly because the long time shopping and walking. ¬†Eh…

I’ll go to bed earlier tonight. ūü§Ē

The New Doctor…

Today, I went to see a NEW Neurology Doctor. It’s down the street from the hospital of my brain surgery in a different building:¬†University of Physicians – Neurology.

I was there to explain to the doctor my “whole¬†story” of all these things I’ve been through with my whole surgery. I explained how my right-arm is much more shaky after getting off this latest medication. Well, they have a plan….

Let’s do MORE Brain Surgery! ¬†ūüôā

I’ll look into it and think about it. No coma-time (unlike my last surgery) and have it be just in & out in a day. Well, I don’t know about that ONE DAY. After surgery on my brain, I’d rather stay in the hospital at least ONE night. Eh?¬†

So, how does this surgery work?

Deep Brain Stimulation for Essential Tremor.
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used to treat a number of movement disorders, including essential tremor. DBS is a way to inactivate the thalamus, a structure deep in the brain that coordinates and controls muscle activity. The true cause of essential tremor is still not understood, but it is thought that the abnormal brain activity that causes tremor is processed through the thalamus.

How Effective Is Deep Brain Stimulation?

Deep brain stimulation provides moderate relief for approximately 90% of patients with essential tremor.

There’s allot more to Deep Brain Stimulation for Essential Tremor, but this list is interesting…

Advantages of deep brain stimulation include:

  • It doesn’t destroy brain tissue and won’t limit future treatment.
  • The device can be removed at any time.
  • It is adjustable.
  • It may be more effective in controlling tremors than¬†thalamotomy, or destruction of the thalamus.

Disadvantages of deep brain stimulation include:

  • Increased risk of infection from the presence of a foreign object in the body
  • Repeat surgery every three to five years in order to replace the battery in the device
  • Uncomfortable sensations that may occur during stimulation

MY THOUGHT:¬†“Well, everything has disadvantages…”

Let’s look into it more….

What Happens During Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery?

Using CT or MRI scans, surgeons will target areas for placement of the electrodes. Some doctors may use an electrode-recording technique to map and target the specific areas in the brain they will need to reach.

Once the correct location is identified, the permanent electrodes are implanted in the brain. The loose ends are placed underneath the skin of the head and the incision is closed with sutures. The wires are attached to a small impulse generator, about the size of a pacemaker, that is placed under the skin on the upper chest. Two to four weeks later, the IPG is turned on and adjusted. It may take a few weeks until the stimulators and medications are adjusted before a person gets relief from symptoms.

Will I Be Asleep During Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery?

You will remain awake but in a type of “twilight” zone during most of deep brain stimulation surgery. This allows the surgical team to interact with you when testing the effects of the stimulation. Small amounts of local anesthetic (pain-relieving medication) are given in sensitive areas. The vast majority of people experience minimal discomfort during the procedure.

MY THOUGHT: “Twilight Zone…. I’ve always loved that show! ūüôā Basically awake during the entire surgery. Pretty much….”

What Should I Expect After Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery?

After deep brain stimulation surgery, you may feel tired and sore but will be given medication to keep you comfortable. Also, you may have irritation or soreness around the stitches and pin sites.

As with any surgery, there are some guidelines and limitations that you should follow after DBS. Be sure to discuss these with your doctor and ask questions before surgery. Understanding what you will be experiencing and knowing what to expect afterward can help ease some of the natural anxiety that comes with any medical procedure.

Can I Use Electrical Devices After Deep Brain Stimulation?

While you should be able to use most electronic devices after DBS surgery, you should be aware that:

  • Some devices, such as theft detectors and screening devices, like those found in airports, department stores, and public libraries, may be triggered by your device. It may take extra time to go through airport security. Always carry the identification card given to you. With this, you may request assistance to bypass those devices.
  • You will be able to use home appliances, computers, and cellular phones. They do not usually interfere with your implanted stimulator.
  • You will be provided with a magnet to activate and deactivate your stimulator. This magnet may damage televisions, credit cards, and computer discs. Always keep it at least one foot away from these items.

MY THOUGHT: “Kicks theft detectors? …screening devices? Ugh… Might be a little hard with that. (kinda funny, though…)”

But, still do-able…

Ah! A Psychiatrist…

Lets see…

Neurologist.
Neurosurgeon.
Psychologist.
(I know there’s other BIG words for the “people I see”)
And NOW a Psychiatrist… at least in my town.

This was cool. This is the type of Doctor that¬†people¬†go and see every once in awhile, to talk to and get a different medication for that reason. At least, this is the reason as to who this person will be…. for me.

Basically, I sat there and told my “story” (pretty much everything in this blog) and then we discussed medication.

Lastly, we talked about the next appointment…
“eh… I’ll see you next month.”

Works for me!